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God Brahma
Brahma is the Hindu god (deva) of creation and one of the Trimurti, the others being Vishnu and Shiva. According to the Brahma Purana, he is the father of Manu, and from Manu all human beings are descended. In the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, he is often referred to as the progenitor or great grandsire of all human beings. He is not to be confused with the Supreme Cosmic Spirit in Hindu Vedanta philosophy known as Brahman, which is genderless. Brahma's consort is Savitri and Gayatri. Saraswati sits beside him, the goddess of learning. Brahma is often identified with Prajapati, a Vedic deity.

At the beginning of the process of creation, Brahma created eleven Prajapatis (used in another sense), who are believed to be the fathers of the human race. The Manusmriti enumerates them as Marici, Atri, Angiras, Pulastya, Pulaha, Kratuj, Vashishta, Pracetas or Daksha, Bhrigu, and Narada[1]. He is also said to have created the seven great sages or the Saptarishi to help him create the universe. However since all these sons of his were born out of his mind rather than body, they are called Manas Putras or mind-sons or spirits. Within Vedic and Puranic scripture Brahma is described as only occasionally interfering in the affairs of the other devas (gods), and even more rarely in mortal affairs. He did force Soma to give Tara back to her husband, Brihaspati. He is considered the father of Dharma and Atri.

According to the Puranas, Brahma is self-born (without mother) in the lotus flower. Another legend says that Brahma was born in water. A seed that later became the golden egg. From this golden egg, Brahma the creator was born, as Hiranyagarbha. The remaining materials of this golden egg expanded into the Brahm-anda or Universe. Being born in water, Brahma is also called Kanja (born in water). Brahma is said also to be the son of the Supreme Being, Brahma, and the female energy known as Prakrti or Maya.[citation needed]

The image depiction displaying the connection by lotus between Brahma and Vishnu can also be taken as a symbolism for the primordial fetus and primordial placenta. The placenta is generated upon conception, but only the fetus continues into the world afterward. Likewise, Brahma is involved in creation, but Vishnu continues thereafter.

Lack of Brahma worship in India
Although Brahma is one of the three [3] major gods in Hinduism, few Hindus actually worship him. Today, India has very few temples dedicated to Brahma, as opposed to the tens of thousands of temples dedicated to the other deities in the Trimurti, namely Vishnu and Shiva. Among the few that exist today, the most famous is the temple in Pushkar in Rajasthan. Others include one in Thirunavaya in Kerala; one in the temple town of Kumbakonam, (Thanjavur District) in Tamil Nadu; another in Kodumudi, Erode district, Tamil Nadu; Nerur village in Kudal taluka of Sindhudurg district of Maharashtra ; one in Asotra village in Balotra taluka of Barmer district in Rajasthan known as Kheteshwara Brahmadham Tirtha; one in Brahma-Karmali village in Sattari Taluka in Goa; one in Khedbrahma in Gujarat; and one in the village of Khokhan in the Kullu Valley, 4 km from Bhuntar. Regular pujas are held for Lord Brahma at the temple in Thirunavaya, and during Navaratri the temple comes to life with colourful festivities. Another temple for Lord Brahma, Sri Brahmapureeswarar Temple is located at Thirupattur, near Tiruchirapalli, Tamil Nadu, South India. The idol of Lord Brahma is fully covered with turmeric everyday morning. This temple also has the Samadhi for Sage Patanjali and the nearby Kasi Vishwanathar Temple in the same temple complex has a Samadhi for Sage Vyakrapatha.

Various stories in Hindu mythology talk about curses that have supposedly prevented Brahma from being worshiped on Earth. Interestingly, the Bhavishya Purana states that, certain 'daityas' or demons had begun to worship Brahma and therefore the 'devas' of heaven could not defeat them. In order to mislead the daityas from the worship of Brahma, Vishnu appeared on Earth, as Buddha and Mahavira. With various arguments he convinced the daityas to leave the worship of Brahma. Having left the worship of Brahma, the daityas lost power and were hence defeated. The Bhavishya Purana lays out that altogether, giving up the worship of Brahma, was unacceptable in Hindu religion. This is because Brahma signifies a personification of Brahman (God) or is a manifestation of Brahman (God).

According to a story in the Shiva Purana (dedicated to Lord Shiva), at the beginning of time in Cosmos, Vishnu and Brahma approached a huge Shiva linga and set out to find its beginning and end. Vishnu was appointed to seek the end and Brahma the beginning. Taking the form of a boar, Vishnu began digging downwards into the earth, while Brahma took the form of a swan and began flying upwards. However, neither could find His appointed destination. Vishnu, satisfied, came up to Shiva and bowed down to him as a swarupa of Brahman. Brahma did not give up so easily. As He was going up, he saw a ketaki flower, dear to Shiva. His ego forced him to ask the flower to bear false witness about Brahma's discovery of Shiva's beginning. When Brahma told his tale, Shiva, the all-knowing, was angered by the former's ego. Shiva thus cursed him that no being in the three worlds will worship him.A depiction of Khambhavati Ragini, A lady worshiping Brahma

According to another legend, Brahma is not worshiped because of a curse by the great sage Brahmarishi Bhrigu. The high priest Bhrigu was organising a great fire-sacrifice (yajna) on Earth. It was decided that the greatest among all Gods would be made the presiding deity. Bhrigu then set off to find the greatest among the Trimurti. When he went to Brahma, the god was so immersed in the music played by Saraswati that he could hardly hear Bhrigu's calls. The enraged Bhrigu then cursed Brahma that no person on Earth would ever invoke him or worship him again.

In the Brahma Purana and Hindu cosmology, Brahma is regarded as the creator but not necessarily as God. Rather, He is regarded as a creation of God / Brahman. The lifespan of Brahma is 100 Brahma years, equivalent to 311,040,000,000,000 solar years (311 trillion and 40 billion earth years). At the end of His lifespan, there will be a gap of 100 Brahma years, after which another Brahma or creator will begin the process of creation anew. This cycle is thought to repeat without end.

The complexion of Lord Brahma is red.[citation needed] He is clad in red clothes. Brahma is traditionally depicted with four heads, four faces, and four arms. With each head, He continually recites one of the four Vedas. He is often depicted with a white beard (especially in North India), indicating the nearly eternal nature of his existence. Unlike most other Hindu Gods, Brahma holds no weapons. One of His hands holds a scepter in the form of a spoon, which is associated with the pouring of holy ghee or oil onto a sacrificial pyre, signifying Brahma as the lord of sacrifices. Another of His hands holds a 'kamandalu'- a jar made of metal or even coconut shell, containing water. The water in this jar signifies the initial, all-encompassing ether in which the first element of creation evolved. Brahma also holds a string of prayer beads called the 'akshamala' (literally "garland of eyes"), which He uses to keep track of the Universe's time. He is also shown holding the Vedas and, sometimes, a lotus flower.

Another story in connection with Brahma's four heads is that when Brahma was creating the Universe, He made a female deity known as Shatarupa (one with a hundred beautiful forms). Brahma became immediately infatuated with Her. Shatarupa moved in various directions to avoid the gaze of Brahma. But wherever She went, Brahma developed a head. Thus, Brahma developed five heads, one on each side and one above the others. In order to control Brahma, Shiva cut off one of the heads. Also, Shiva felt that Shatarupa was Brahma's daughter, having been created by Him. Therefore, Shiva determined it was wrong for Brahma to become obsessed with Her. Shiva directed that there be no proper worship on earth for the "unholy" Brahma. Thus, only Vishnu and Shiva continued to be worshiped, while Brahma is almost totally ignored.

Ever since this incident, Brahma has been believed to be reciting the four Vedas in His attempt at repentance. However, there are many other stories in the Puranas about the gradual decrease Lord Brahma's importance, such as in the Shiva Purana. The omission of Brahma from most temples regarding worship is a serious concern in the orthopraxis of Hinduism. Ignoring the Supreme Creator also sidelines the importance of Saraswati, the goddess of learning, in temples. A British viceroy and admirer of Hinduism[who?] reportedly remarked in philosophical reflection that India cannot afford to lose the blessings of Brahma and Saraswati, without whom the populace would lack creativity, knowledge, and education.

Symbols

The Four Hands - Brahma's four arms represent the four cardinal directions: east, south, west, and north. The back right hand represents mind, the back left hand represents intellect, the front right hand is ego, and the front left hand is self-confidence.
The Rosary - Symbolizes the substances used in the process of creation.
The Book - The book symbolizes knowledge.
The Gold - Gold symbolizes activity; the golden face of Brahma indicates that He is actively involved in the process of creating the Universe.
The Swan - The swan is the symbol of grace and discernment. Brahma uses the swan as his vahana, or his carrier or vehicle.
The Crown - Lord Brahma's crown indicates His supreme authority.
The Lotus - The lotus symbolizes nature and the living essence of all things and beings in the Universe.
The Beard - Brahma's black or white beard denotes wisdom and the eternal process of creation.
The Four Faces - The four Vedas (Rik, Sama, Yajuh and Atharva). The Vedas Symbolises his four faces, heads and arms

Vehicle Brahma's vehicle is a divine Swan. This divine bird is bestowed with a virtue called Neera-Ksheera Viveka, or the ability to separate milk and water from a mixture of the two. The swan signifies that all creatures deserve justice, however entwined they might be in challenging situations. Also, this virtue indicates that one should learn to separate the good from the bad, accepting that which is valuable and discarding what is worthless.

Brahma samhita

Brahma's prayers are recorded in Brahma-samhita. From this scripture we know that Brahma is devotee of Vishnu, and what is structure of both material and spiritual universes. According to Brahma's authority we can know that Krishna is the Supreme God.

Brahma says: "isvarah paramah krsnah, sac-cid-ananda-vigrahah anadir adir govindah, sarva-karana-karanam" which means: Krishna who is known as Govinda is the Supreme God. He has an eternal blissful spiritual body. He is the origin of all. He has no other origin and He is the prime cause of all causes. Brahma lets us know that Krishna expands Himself as Baladeva, as caturvyuha (Aniruddha, Pradyumna, Sankarsana, Vasudeva), as Narayana and then as another caturvyuha, from which (Sankarsana) comes Mahavishnu. So our Brahma is one of many Brahmas who is one of many material universes which appear from Mahavishnu's breathing out.

Som Brahma samhita is important scripture of Brahma-sampradaya which lets us know about material and spiritual from Brahma, who is first lving being in this material world. Brahma created material planets in this material world on order of Vishu, and we can know that still Brahma is not topmost personality in this universe, as even he worships Vishnu.

Brahma lives for his 100 years of Brahma, however even after Brahma has to leave his material body, Vishnu remains always in His eternal spiritual body also after dissolution of material universe. Even when all material universes become unmanifested and Mahavishnu breathes in, still he, Mahavishnu remains untouched by material nature.

Brahma lets us know that supreme abode in spiritual world is Goloka Vrindavana, and that abode is always manifested even though material world is sometimes not manifested. So Brahma worships Krishna: "govindam adi-purusham tam aham bhajami" I worship Govinda, the primeval Lord. So Brahma says that Krishna Govinda is source of countless eternal spiritual universes and temporary (which means they are either manifested or unmanifested) material universes. brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india brahma mandir india
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